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Teaching Foreign Languages to Immigrant Students in Insecure Times, March 2

Recent proposals to reverse immigration policies are creating a climate of insecurity among immigrant communities and negatively impacting segments of the students we teach. Heightened pedagogical awareness and the application of cultural sensibilities toward the learning needs of students experiencing increased vulnerability are needed now more than ever. This workshop aims to share recent pedagogical research on teaching immigrant communities, specifically as it applies to foreign language instruction, and deliver experiential strategies and a suite of exercises that are immediately applicable to the foreign language and intensive writing classroom.

Participants can expect to:

  • Be presented with relevant research and data on the topic of immigration
  • Be exposed to techniques and methodologies for addressing the particular learning challenges of immigrant students
  • Learn strategies and practices for enhancing student classroom participation and favoring an inclusive environment
  • Take away exercises that they can modify for their own language instruction purposes
  • Share their own experiences and challenges with teaching immigrant communities

Date: Friday, March 2, 2018
Time: 12:00 pm to 3:30 pm
Location: President’s Conference Room 1, Rosenthal Library, Fifth Floor
Map: https://goo.gl/maps/gSdXpvKec222

RSVP: https://goo.gl/tFnh6G

Workshop Moderators:

Elena Mancini has been teaching German language and literature and film and writing intensive courses at Queens College in New York City since 2012. She holds a Ph.D. in Germanic Languages and Literatures from Rutgers University and is the author of Magnus Hirschfeld and the Quest for Sexual Freedom: A History of the First International Sexual Freedom Movement (New York: Palgrave, 2010). Her research interests include modern and contemporary German literature, gender politics, transnationalism, and translation studies. Elena also serves as the Culture Editor of Logos: A Journal of Modern Society and Culture, and is currently working on several German-English and Italian-English translation projects, including the writings of Magnus Hirschfeld and fiction by Carmen-Francesca Banciu.

Federica Franzé received her Laurea (Italian university degree) in Foreign Languages and Literatures from the University of Urbino, Italy. She has a Master’s in Italian Literature and a Ph.D. in German from Rutgers University, where she has taught both languages. She is currently a Lecturer in Italian at Columbia University and language coordinator for the intermediate courses. Her research interests include Transnational Literature and Cinema, Pedagogy, teacher training and language teaching through technology.

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